Royal Navy submarines to inform climate change research

Data col­lect­ed by Roy­al Navy sub­marines, as part of stan­dard oper­a­tions, is set to pro­vide clues on Arc­tic cli­mate change.

 -
A Roy­al Navy sub­mariner shov­els Arc­tic ice from the upper deck of HMS Tire­less (stock image) [Pic­ture: POA(Phot) Ter­ry Seward, Crown Copyright/MOD 2007]
Source: Min­istry of Defence, UK
Click to enlarge

Lit­tle is known about the areas of water under­neath the Arc­tic ice, as sen­sors are dif­fi­cult to place for the long-term. Now, UK envi­ron­men­tal researchers are to be pre­sent­ed with pre­vi­ous­ly unavail­able infor­ma­tion, thanks to the Min­istry of Defence.

Envi­ron­men­tal data such as water tem­per­a­ture and salt con­tent is rou­tine­ly mon­i­tored by all Roy­al Navy ves­sels, includ­ing sub­marines, and so the data set from a UK sub­ma­rine mis­sion can pro­vide a snap­shot of con­di­tions under the ice and shed light on the changes tak­ing place in the Arc­tic.

The MOD’s Defence Sci­ence and Tech­nol­o­gy Lab­o­ra­to­ry (Dstl) is work­ing with the Nat­ur­al Envi­ron­ment Research Coun­cil (NERC) and the UK Hydro­graph­ic Office to pre­pare data for the ben­e­fit of envi­ron­men­tal researchers.

Dstl was involved in the ear­ly part of the project, con­sult­ing with researchers and assess­ing which infor­ma­tion would be appro­pri­ate for their stud­ies. The project, known as the Sub­ma­rine Esti­mates of Arc­tic Tur­bu­lence Spec­tra, is fund­ed through NERC’s Arc­tic Research Pro­gramme.

It will see the con­trolled release of sci­en­tif­ic data on record­ed envi­ron­men­tal changes, pos­si­bly paving the way for fur­ther data to be released in the future.

“The MOD is excit­ed by this project since it puts UK researchers at the fore­front of cli­mate change sci­ence. Any progress will, ulti­mate­ly, lead to an improved oceano­graph­ic prod­uct for Roy­al Navy oper­a­tions.”
Tim Clarke

Data will be released to aca­d­e­mics at NERC’s Nation­al Oceanog­ra­phy Cen­tre (NOC), based at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Southamp­ton Water­front Cam­pus, for analy­sis. This could, for the first time, uncov­er the impact of cli­mate change in rela­tion to what’s hap­pen­ing in the Arc­tic.

Dstl marine sci­en­tist Tim Clarke said:

“This has real­ly been a col­lab­o­ra­tive effort and with­out co-oper­a­tion of all bod­ies involved it would not have been pos­si­ble.

“What this rep­re­sents is the avail­abil­i­ty of impor­tant sci­en­tif­ic data, pre­vi­ous­ly inac­ces­si­ble, which can only move the study for­ward.

“The MOD is excit­ed by this project since it puts UK researchers at the fore­front of cli­mate change sci­ence. Any progress will, ulti­mate­ly, lead to an improved oceano­graph­ic prod­uct for Roy­al Navy oper­a­tions.”

NOC researcher John Allen said:

“We’re delight­ed that this infor­ma­tion will be avail­able and thank each of the organ­i­sa­tions who have been instru­men­tal in releas­ing this data.

“It’s real­ly impor­tant to have this infor­ma­tion as it will enable us to clear­ly mea­sure the changes which have occurred in recent years, which is para­mount for the accu­ra­cy, wider impact and lega­cy of glob­al envi­ron­men­tal sci­ence research.”

Press release
Min­istry of Defence, UK

More news and arti­cles can be found on Face­book and Twit­ter.

Fol­low GlobalDefence.net on Face­book and/or on Twit­ter

Team GlobDef

Team GlobDef

Seit 2001 ist GlobalDefence.net im Internet unterwegs, um mit eigenen Analysen, interessanten Kooperationen und umfassenden Informationen für einen spannenden Überblick der Weltlage zu sorgen. GlobalDefenc.net war dabei die erste deutschsprachige Internetseite, die mit dem Schwerpunkt Sicherheitspolitik außerhalb von Hochschulen oder Instituten aufgetreten ist.

Alle Beiträge ansehen von Team GlobDef →