US Army evaluates company command posts at NIE 12.1

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Army News Ser­vice, Dec. 2, 2011) — Sol­diers recent­ly fin­ished eval­u­a­tion of three vari­ants of the “Com­pa­ny Com­mand Post Node” as part of Net­work Inte­gra­tion Eval­u­a­tion 12.1.

 -
Sol­diers recent­ly fin­ished eval­u­a­tion of three vari­ants of the “Com­pa­ny Com­mand Post Node” as part of Net­work Inte­gra­tion Eval­u­a­tion 12.1. One of the three pri­ma­ry vari­ants of the CoCP eval­u­at­ed dur­ing NIE 12.1 was the Caiman mine-resis­tant, ambush-pro­tect­ed, or MRAP, tent-based CoCP. That vari­ant pro­vides Sol­diers mis­sion-crit­i­cal com­mand capa­bil­i­ties onboard the MRAP vehi­cle. When the mis­sion becomes more sta­tion­ary, Sol­diers can employ the system’s tent to max­i­mize the CoCP capa­bil­i­ties.
Click to enlarge

The three-week eval­u­a­tion, which end­ed Nov. 19, helped demon­strate the abil­i­ty of each of the sys­tems to deliv­er com­mu­ni­ca­tions capa­bil­i­ty to those in the low­est ech­e­lons of the Army — the Sol­diers who phys­i­cal­ly exe­cute the Army’s mis­sion “at the tac­ti­cal edge.” 

“I see the com­pa­ny as a mas­sive intel­li­gence and infor­ma­tion-gath­er­ing point,” said Capt. Scott DeWitt, who pre­vi­ous­ly served as a com­pa­ny com­man­der with 2nd Brigade, 1st Armored Divi­sion. The 2/1 AD was the unit involved in the Net­work Inte­gra­tion Eval­u­a­tions, or NIEs. “It is the point where you are going to dis­sem­i­nate your orders, and they are going to get exe­cut­ed at the final tip of the spear — the squad level.” 

Among the key pri­or­i­ties eval­u­at­ed dur­ing the var­i­ous NIEs is the role of the Com­pa­ny Com­mand Post Nodes, or CoCPs, in “mis­sion com­mand on-the-move.” Extend­ing the net­work to the indi­vid­ual Sol­dier is also a priority. 

“Extend­ing the net­work down to the indi­vid­ual Sol­dier is a pri­or­i­ty in the Army,” said Maj. Bri­an Mack, CoCP trail boss at NIE 12.1. He said the CoCP is an impor­tant part of pro­vid­ing Sol­diers at the tac­ti­cal edge the abil­i­ty to both send and receive data. 

One of the three pri­ma­ry vari­ants of the CoCP eval­u­at­ed dur­ing NIE 12.1 was the Caiman mine-resis­tant, ambush-pro­tect­ed, or MRAP, tent-based CoCP. That vari­ant pro­vides Sol­diers mis­sion-crit­i­cal com­mand capa­bil­i­ties onboard the MRAP vehi­cle. When the mis­sion becomes more sta­tion­ary, Sol­diers can employ the system’s tent to max­i­mize the CoCP capabilities. 

A sec­ond vari­ant is called the “Trail­er Mount­ed Sup­port Sys­tem-Medi­um.” This tent-based sys­tem is mount­ed in a trail­er, and includes an 18-kilo­watt gen­er­a­tor and an envi­ron­men­tal con­trol unit. The sys­tem is inte­grat­ed with crit­i­cal mis­sion com­mand sys­tems that take advan­tage of a SIPR/NIPR Access Point, or SNAP, ter­mi­nal to pro­vide satel­lite connectivity. 

The third vari­ant sys­tem eval­u­at­ed was an indus­try-pro­vid­ed option that may pro­vide pos­si­ble solu­tions to cur­rent mis­sion requirements. 

Inside the CoCP, com­pa­ny com­man­ders can uti­lize crit­i­cal col­lab­o­ra­tive mis­sion com­mand appli­ca­tions that were pre­vi­ous­ly only avail­able at lev­els above bat­tal­ion. Includ­ed among those appli­ca­tions is Tac­ti­cal Ground Report­ing, which gives Sol­diers the abil­i­ty to col­lect, share and ana­lyze patrol data in a cen­tral database. 

“Syn­the­siz­ing all of these things togeth­er into one ele­ment gives you the abil­i­ty to have com­pa­ny-lev­el sit­u­a­tion­al aware­ness in a uni­fied pack­age,” said Capt. Joseph D. Per­ry, a com­pa­ny com­man­der with­in 2/1 AD eval­u­at­ing a pro­to­type Com­pa­ny Com­mand Post dur­ing the cur­rent NIE

“With this I can inter­act and pro­vide feed­back to my bat­tal­ion com­man­der, my bat­tal­ion staff on the move, and com­mand my com­pa­ny on the move, uti­liz­ing real-time SA (sit­u­a­tion­al aware­ness) and pro­vid­ing real-time intel­li­gence up and down the chain,” Per­ry said. 

Dur­ing the next eval­u­a­tion, NIE 12.2, which will hap­pen in the spring of 2012, the Army will be eval­u­at­ing two new vari­ants of the CoCP, based on solu­tions cho­sen by the Depart­ment of the Army. 

The ulti­mate com­mand post vari­ant field­ed in the Army’s future capa­bil­i­ty sets must be scal­able to sup­port the many dif­fer­ent oper­a­tions exe­cut­ed by a dis­mount­ed, air­borne, or mech­a­nized com­pa­ny element. 

“The com­pa­ny com­mand post solu­tion is evolv­ing and 12.1 is just anoth­er iter­a­tion of that evo­lu­tion,” said Lt. Col. Carl Hol­lis­ter, prod­uct man­ag­er for Com­mand Post Sys­tems and Inte­gra­tion. “We don’t yet know what the 100-per­cent answer will be. But what­ev­er the final solu­tion may be, it is key, par­tic­u­lar­ly to a com­pa­ny, to pro­vide a ful­ly-inte­grat­ed com­mand post pack­age that is sus­tain­able with a train­ing pack­age that goes along with it.” 

Source:
US Army 

More news and arti­cles can be found on Face­book and Twitter.

Fol­low GlobalDefence.net on Face­book and/or on Twit­ter

Team GlobDef

Team GlobDef

Seit 2001 ist GlobalDefence.net im Internet unterwegs, um mit eigenen Analysen, interessanten Kooperationen und umfassenden Informationen für einen spannenden Überblick der Weltlage zu sorgen. GlobalDefenc.net war dabei die erste deutschsprachige Internetseite, die mit dem Schwerpunkt Sicherheitspolitik außerhalb von Hochschulen oder Instituten aufgetreten ist.

Alle Beiträge ansehen von Team GlobDef →