US Army acquires recoilless, shoulder-fired weapon

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army Sol­diers in Afghanistan are now fir­ing an 84mm, reusable, recoil­less shoul­der-fired con­ven­tion­al muni­tion able to destroy ene­my tar­gets hid­den behind rocks, trees and build­ings , ser­vice offi­cials said.

 -
The U.S. Army Sol­diers in Afghanistan are now fir­ing an 84mm, reusable, recoil­less shoul­der-fired con­ven­tion­al muni­tion called the Carl-Gustaf, which is able to destroy ene­my tar­gets hid­den behind rocks, trees and build­ings
Click to enlarge

The weapon, called the Mul­ti-Role Anti-Armor, Anti-Per­son­nel Weapons Sys­tem, known as the Carl-Gustaf, was ordered by the Army in response to an Oper­a­tional Needs State­ment from Afghanistan seek­ing to pro­cure a direct fire, man-portable, anti-per­son­nel and light struc­ture weapon able, among oth­er things, to respond to insur­gent rock­et-pro­pelled grenade, or RPG, fire, said Bhu­vanesh Thogu­lu­va, chief of Vehi­cle Pro­tec­tion, Rock­ets & Shoul­der Fired Weapons Branch, Muni­tion Sys­tems & Tech­ni­cal Direc­torate, Arma­ment Research Devel­op­ment and Engi­neer­ing Cen­ter, Picatin­ny Arse­nal, N.J.

The Carl-Gustaf, which is man­u­fac­tured by Saab, includes an air­burst capa­bil­i­ty with its High Explo­sive, or HE, round, Thogu­lu­va said.

“The HE round does have an air­burst capa­bil­i­ty. It is the one that is uti­lized most often because of its effec­tive range. It uses a mechan­i­cal time fuse which is set pri­or to load­ing the weapon sys­tem,” he said.

Air­burst rounds can be pre-pro­grammed to explode in the air at a pre­cise loca­tion, there­by max­i­miz­ing the weapon’s effect against ene­my tar­gets hid­ing, for exam­ple, behind a rock, tree or build­ing.

Sev­er­al Carl Gustaf’s are already in Afghanistan as part of a lim­it­ed oper­a­tional assess­ment, which may indeed result in more deliv­er­ies. The Army pur­chased the weapon by join­ing with U.S. Spe­cial Oper­a­tions Com­mand in a com­bined pur­chase from Saab.

“Thus far, the weapon has been very effec­tive,” said Thogu­lu­va.

The weapon, now being eval­u­at­ed by the Army, has been used by U.S. Army Rangers, Navy SEALs and Spe­cial Forces since the late-80s, Thogu­lu­va said.

The anti-armor, anti-per­son­nel, shoul­der-fired mul­ti-role weapon is 42-inch­es long weighs 21 pounds and can fire up to four rounds per minute, said Wes Wal­ters, exec­u­tive vice pes­i­dent for mar­ket­ing, Saab North Amer­i­ca.

“It is not a guid­ed muni­tion,” Wal­ters explained, adding that the weapon can uti­lize ther­mal sight to pro­vide Sol­diers with the abil­i­ty to shoot at night and reach the prop­er range.

The Carl Gustaf is also able to fire anti-tank, flechette, illu­mi­na­tion, enhanced armor, smoke and High Explo­sive Dual Pur­pose rounds, Thogu­lu­va explained.

“The High Explo­sive Dual Pur­pose round gives you two dif­fer­ent capa­bil­i­ties. In impact mode, the round goes off imme­di­ate­ly as soon as it hits the tar­get. In delay mode, the round pen­e­trates the tar­get and then goes off,” he said.

Source:
U.S. Army

More news and arti­cles can be found on Face­book and Twit­ter.

Fol­low GlobalDefence.net on Face­book and/or on Twit­ter

Team GlobDef

Team GlobDef

Seit 2001 ist GlobalDefence.net im Internet unterwegs, um mit eigenen Analysen, interessanten Kooperationen und umfassenden Informationen für einen spannenden Überblick der Weltlage zu sorgen. GlobalDefenc.net war dabei die erste deutschsprachige Internetseite, die mit dem Schwerpunkt Sicherheitspolitik außerhalb von Hochschulen oder Instituten aufgetreten ist.

Alle Beiträge ansehen von Team GlobDef →