USA — Navy to Christen Amphibious Transport Dock Ship San Diego

The Navy will chris­ten the newest amphibi­ous trans­port dock ship, San Diego, Sat­ur­day, June 12, 2010, dur­ing a 10 a.m. CDT cer­e­mo­ny at Northrop Grum­man Ship­build­ing inPascagoula, Miss. The ship is named for the city of San Diego, prin­ci­pal home­port of the Pacif­ic fleet, and hon­ors the peo­ple of “America’s Finest City” and its lead­ers for their con­tin­u­ous sup­port of the mil­i­tary.

Gen. James Amos, assis­tant com­man­dant of the Marine Corps, will deliv­er the ceremony’s prin­ci­pal address. Lin­da Win­ter, wife of for­mer Sec­re­tary of the Navy Don­ald Win­ter, is the spon­sor, and in accor­dance with Navy tra­di­tion, will break a bot­tle of cham­pagne across the bow to for­mal­ly chris­ten the ship.

Des­ig­nat­ed LPD 22, San Diego is the sixth amphibi­ous trans­port dock ship in the San Anto­nio class. As an ele­ment of future expe­di­tionary strike groups, the ship will sup­port the Marine Corps “mobil­i­ty tri­ad,” which con­sists of the land­ing craft air cush­ion vehi­cle, the Expe­di­tionary Fight­ing Vehi­cle and the Osprey tilt-rotor air­craft. San Diego will pro­vide improved warfight­ing capa­bil­i­ties, includ­ing an advanced com­mand-and-con­trol suite, increased lift-capa­bil­i­ty in vehi­cle and car­go-car­ry­ing capac­i­ty and advanced ship-sur­viv­abil­i­ty fea­tures. The ship is capa­ble of embark­ing a land­ing force of up to 800 Marines.

Three pre­vi­ous ships have car­ried the name San Diego — an armored cruis­er (ACR 6) named in 1914, a World War II-era cruis­er (CL 53) com­mis­sioned in 1942, and a com­bat stores ship (AFS 6) that served from 1969 to 1997.

Cmdr. Jon Hay­del, of Hous­ton, is the prospec­tive com­mand­ing offi­cer and will lead a crew of 360 offi­cers and enlist­ed Navy per­son­nel and three Marines. The 24,900-ton San Diego is 684 feet in length, has an over­all beam of 105 feet, and a nav­i­ga­tion­al draft of 23 feet. Four tur­bo-charged diesels pow­er the ship to sus­tained speeds of 22 knots.

Source:
U.S. Depart­ment of Defense
Office of the Assis­tant Sec­re­tary of Defense (Pub­lic Affairs)