USA — Department Announces July Recruiting, Retention Data

WASHINGTON — Three of the four ser­vices met or exceed­ed their active duty recruit­ing goals for July, and the one that fell short did so inten­tion­al­ly, Defense Depart­ment offi­cials announced today.

The Marine Corps inten­tion­al­ly slowed down recruit­ing efforts by 1 per­cent last month because the ser­vice already is exceed­ing its fis­cal 2010 recruit­ing goals, offi­cials said. The July goal, set a year in advance, was to bring in 2,847 new recruits. The Marine Corps signed on 2,845 recruits last month.

The Army recruit­ed 6,975 sol­diers, 104 per­cent of its goal. The Navy and Air Force met their goals by sign­ing on 2,990 sailors and 1,920 air­men, respec­tive­ly.

With two months left in fis­cal 2010, all of the ser­vices have met or are above their fis­cal year reten­tion goals.

Mean­while, three of the six reserve com­po­nents met or exceed­ed their July acces­sion goals, and the oth­er three fell short on pur­pose.

The Navy Reserve met its goal, recruit­ing 553 sailors. The Air Nation­al Guard and Air Force Reserve exceed­ed their goals by 26 and 17 per­cent, respec­tive­ly, as the Air Nation­al Guard signed on 507 recruits, and the Air Force Reserve brought in 671 air­men.

The Army Nation­al Guard, Army Reserve and Marine Corps Reserve inten­tion­al­ly scaled back acces­sions because they are ahead of their fis­cal 2010 recruit­ing goals.

The Army Reserve recruit­ed 1,613 sol­diers, falling 6 per­cent short of its July goal. The Army Nation­al Guard missed by 24 per­cent, sign­ing on 4,459 new Guards­men, and the Marine Corps Reserve signed on 807 part-time Marines, 23 per­cent few­er than its orig­i­nal goal.

Reten­tion rates in the active duty ser­vices are at or above goals for the first 10 months of the fis­cal year, offi­cials said, and attri­tion in all reserve com­po­nents is with­in accept­able lim­its.

Source:
U.S. Depart­ment of Defense
Office of the Assis­tant Sec­re­tary of Defense (Pub­lic Affairs)

More news and arti­cles can be found on Face­book and Twit­ter.

Fol­low GlobalDefence.net on Face­book and/or on Twit­ter