USA — ‘Black Knights’ produce mission critical systems

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — The Search and Recov­ery sec­tion of Com­pa­ny B, 204th Brigade Sup­port Bat­tal­ion, 2nd Brigade Com­bat Team, 4th Infantry Divi­sion, mass pro­duces Cul­vert Intru­sion Denial Sys­tems, a defense against impro­vised explo­sive devices, at For­ward Oper­at­ing Base Wal­ton, here.

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Capt. Richard Jones, Com­pa­ny B com­man­der, 204th Brigade Sup­port Bat­tal­ion, 2nd Brigade Com­bat Team, 4th Infantry Divi­sion, shows a Cul­vert Intru­sion Denial Sys­tem to Aaron Tip­pin dur­ing a hol­i­day vis­it at For­ward Oper­at­ing Base Wal­ton, Afghanistan, Nov. 25, 2011. The sys­tem pre­vents the place­ment of impro­vised explo­sive devices inside of cul­verts, which are drains or water­ways cross­ing under roads or bridges. The Cul­vert Intru­sion Denial Sys­tem help pro­tect the civil­ian and mil­i­tary vehi­cles that are con­stant­ly trav­el­ing on those road­ways.
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The sys­tem pre­vents the place­ment of impro­vised explo­sive devices, or IEDs, inside of cul­verts, which are drains or water­ways cross­ing under roads or bridges. Cul­vert Intru­sion Denial Sys­tems, or CIDS, help pro­tect the civil­ian and mil­i­tary vehi­cles that are con­stant­ly trav­el­ing on those road­ways. The sys­tems have proven to be mis­sion crit­i­cal.

Pfc. Gre­go­ry Cox­ton plays a vital role in ensur­ing that the sys­tems are pro­duced in accor­dance with Com­bined Task Force Warhorse dis­tri­b­u­tion pri­or­i­ties. Cox­ton pro­duces four 38 inch CIDS month­ly as opposed to the 25 inch by 4 inch sys­tems pro­duced by oth­er civil­ian con­trac­tors. The main item used to pro­duce the sys­tem is rein­forc­ing bar, known as rebar. Every 38-inch CIDS needs 180 feet of rebar. In the pro­duc­tion of the CIDS, it takes Cox­ton rough­ly a day and a half to have a sys­tem ready for instal­la­tion into a cul­vert.

The CIDS pro­duced by the Search and Recov­ery sec­tion is cir­cu­lar rather than the orig­i­nal design of the Dehart Cul­vert Denial Sys­tem, which was square. This design was cre­at­ed by engi­neers who were pre­vi­ous­ly deployed in Afghanistan.

“The big­ger the Cul­vert Denial Sys­tem, the more detail that goes into it,” said Chief War­rant Offi­cer 2 Gene Bal­der­man. “Cre­at­ing larg­er CIDSs ensures more pro­fi­cien­cy and accu­ra­cy in pro­tect­ing road­ways from IEDs.”

The sys­tem pro­duced by Bra­vo Com­pa­ny is 80 pounds so it takes rough­ly four peo­ple to place the met­al con­trap­tion inside the cul­vert.

The CIDS helps saves lives every day and that is what Cox­ton takes a lot of pride in. “The work that I have done with the CIDS will save lives of civil­ians and Sol­diers, now and in the future,” he said.

Source:
U.S. Army

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