Detainee Dies at Guantanamo Bay

MIAMI, May 18, 2011 — An Afghan detainee died of an appar­ent sui­cide ear­ly this morn­ing at the U.S. deten­tion facil­i­ty at Naval Sta­tion Guan­tanamo Bay, Cuba, accord­ing to a Joint Task Force-Guan­tanamo news release.

The detainee is iden­ti­fied as Inay­at­ul­lah, a 37-year-old Afghan. Inay­at­ul­lah arrived at Guan­tanamo in Sep­tem­ber 2007. As a mat­ter of Defense Depart­ment pol­i­cy, the Naval Crim­i­nal Inves­tiga­tive Ser­vice has ini­ti­at­ed an inves­ti­ga­tion of the inci­dent to deter­mine the cause and man­ner sur­round­ing the death, accord­ing to the release.

While con­duct­ing rou­tine checks, guards found the Inay­at­ul­lah unre­spon­sive and not breath­ing, accord­ing to the release. The guards ini­ti­at­ed CPR and sum­moned med­ical per­son­nel.

After life­sav­ing mea­sures had been exhaust­ed, the detainee was pro­nounced dead by a physi­cian.

The remains of the deceased are being treat­ed with respect for Islam­ic cul­ture and tra­di­tions, accord­ing to the release. A cul­tur­al advi­sor is assist­ing offi­cials to ensure that the remains are han­dled in a cul­tur­al­ly sen­si­tive and reli­gious­ly appro­pri­ate man­ner, accord­ing to the release. The remains will be autop­sied by a pathol­o­gist from the Armed Forces Insti­tute of Pathol­o­gy, based out of Sil­ver Spring, Mary­land. Upon com­ple­tion of the autop­sy, the remains will be pre­pared for repa­tri­a­tion.

Inay­at­ul­lah was an admit­ted plan­ner for al-Qai­da ter­ror­ist oper­a­tions, and attest­ed to facil­i­tat­ing the move­ment of for­eign fight­ers.

Inay­at­ul­lah report­ed­ly met with local oper­a­tives, devel­oped trav­el routes and coor­di­nat­ed doc­u­men­ta­tion, accom­mo­da­tion and vehi­cles for smug­gling al Qai­da bel­liger­ents through Afghanistan, Iran, Pak­istan and Iraq, the release stat­ed.

(Com­piled from a U.S. South­ern Com­mand News Release)

Source:
U.S. Depart­ment of Defense
Office of the Assis­tant Sec­re­tary of Defense (Pub­lic Affairs)

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